FAQ Categories

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Business Personal Property

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Where Is The Business Personal Property Page?
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What Is The Difference Between Sales Tax And Personal Property Tax?
Sales tax is a one-time tax, which is collected at the point of sale. Personal property tax is an annual tax, which is based on the current value of the property.


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What If My Office Is In My Home?
When operating a business from your home, report all personal property used for business purposes.


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How Is My Personal Property Valued?

Your original cost x cost index - depreciation = taxable value. The Nevada Department of Taxation provides the cost index and depreciation factors used to determine the taxable values.

Taxable value is assessed at 35%. Taxable Value x .35 = Assessed Value.

EXAMPLE

ASSET ACQUISITION YEAR ORIGINAL COST COST INDEX DEPRECIATION TAXABLE VALUE ASSESSED VALUE
Office Furniture 2011 $663 1.06 51% $344 $120


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How Much Is The Tax?
Tax information is maintained by the Office of the Washoe County Treasurer.

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What If I Disagree With My Assessment?
If, in your opinion, the assessed value of your personal property shown on your bill is incorrect please contact the Assessor`s Office Personal Property division at 775-328-2213 to voice your concern. If, after discussing the matter, a difference of opinion still exists, you may appeal your assessment to the County or State Board of Equalization. You may obtain the forms from the Assessor`s Office.

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What Happens If I Do Not File A Declaration?
If the owner or agent fails to provide a statement of all personal property owned, claimed, possessed, controlled or managed within Washoe County as of July 1 of the current tax year, NRS 361.265 requires the Assessor to estimate the value of the personal property and assess accordingly.  The Washoe County Treasurer is then responsible for the billing and collection of taxes based on that estimate.


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Do I Include Sales Tax?
No.  As of July 1, 1998 the Nevada Administrative Code (NAC 361.134) was changed to exclude sales tax in the determination of original costs for personal property declarations. 


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What If An Item Has No Acquisition Cost? (Home Built, Donated, Borrowed, Etc.)
For Personal Property purposes, donated or borrowed assets should be reported as if they were purchased.  For equipment that does not have an acquisition cost, you may either 1) Report an estimate of the value of the item in the year you acquired it, or 2) Estimate the current value of the item in its present condition, and report the year of acquisition as the current calendar year.


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Do I Need To Notify The Assessor's Office If I Change My Address Or If I'm No Longer In Business?

Yes. Please e-mail or otherwise notify our office of any changes at any time of the year. Please include your new physical location, mailing address or the approximate date the business terminated.

Washoe County Assessor's Office Personal Property

PO Box 11130

Reno NV 89521-0027

775-328-2213

declarations@washoecounty.us



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What Do I Report?
The personal property declaration requires you to report information on any taxable personal property owned, claimed, possessed, controlled or managed by the person, firm, corporation, association or company on July 1st of the current fiscal year. This information includes the location, the cost and year of acquisition of each item of taxable personal property, including any applicable shipping and installation charges and the cost of any improvements of the personal property, such as additions to or renovations of the property other than routine maintenance or repairs.

Items that are exempt from taxation include business inventory held for resale, consumable supplies (to be used within one year), livestock, boats and personal household belongings. The exemption of household goods does not extend to personal property or furnishings rented or leased to another party or rented in conjunction with the rental of a dwelling unit. Motor vehicles required to be registered with the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles and Public Safety are exempt from the property tax, though subject to a governmental service tax.


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What If I Have No Personal Property?
If you are in business and/or have a current Reno, Sparks or Washoe County business license, you are required to file yearly personal property declaratoins with the Assessor's office.  If you do not use any furniture, fixtures, equipment, etc. , please indicate this on the declaration and explain why your business has no personal property. 

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What If I Have Used Equipment?
Report used equipment in the same manner as other personal property. If you do not have a record of your acquisition cost, you may either 1) Report an estimate of the value of the item in the year you acquired it, or, 2) Estimate the current value of the item in its present condition, and  report the year of acquisition as the current calendar year.

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What If I Use Someone Else's Equipment?
You will be required to furnish information regarding the name and address of the owner or lessor and a description of the equipment.


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What Is Personal Property Tax?
It is a tax according to value (ad valorem) levied on all property not permanently affixed to land, such as business equipment, building improvements, aircraft , agricultural equipment, possessory interests, billboards, etc. Click here for Personal Property Overview.

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When Do I Pay?
Do not send payment with your declaration. Although a lien for the taxes attaches on July 1st, personal property bills are sent out by the Washoe County Treasurer's office between August and May of each fiscal year. Taxes are due 30 days from the billing date located on the personal property tax bill.
 
There is no provision in the statues for proration. If you are in business on July 1st you are liable for the full tax amount.


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When Do I Report?
Notice to file reminders are sent out in June of each year.  Declarations must be filed online no later than July 31st.  The Assessor may grant one or more filing extensions upon request.

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Which Building Improvements Do I Report?
Report all building improvements you have made in detail, including year of acquisition, description and cost. Our office will determine if they are taxable and ensure they will not be taxed as both personal property and real property.


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Do I Report Depreciation?
No. Report the original acquisition costs and year of acquisition. The Assessor's office will apply depreciation according to a schedule supplied by the Nevada Department of Taxation.

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Who Has To Report?
State statutes require every person, firm, corporation, association or company doing business in Nevada to report annually to the county where the personal property is located.


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Exemptions

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Who Is Considered To Be Qualified For The "Blind" Exemption?
The Blind Persons Exemption is available to residents with visual acuity that does not exceed 20/200 in the better eye when corrected, or whose field of vision subtends an angle of 20 degrees or less. To qualify for this exemption, it is necessary to furnish a licensed physician's statement that the above requirements are met and sign an affidavit of bona fide residency*.

*NRS 361.015 "Bona fide resident" defined. "Bona fide resident" means a person who has:

1. Established a residence in the State of Nevada; and

2. Actually resided in this state for at least 6 months or has a valid driver`s license or identification card issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles of this state.


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What Qualifies A Veteran For The "Disabled Veteran" Exemption?
The Disabled Veteran`s Exemption is provided for veterans who have a permanent service connection disability of at least 60%.

To qualify for this exemption, you must be a bona fide resident* of Nevada and furnish copies of your separation papers showing dates of entry and discharge and documentation of the percentage of service connected disability from the Veteran`s Administration. The surviving spouse of a disabled veteran who was eligible for this exemption at the time of his/her death may also be eligible to receive the benefits of this program.

*NRS 361.015 "Bona fide resident" defined. "Bona fide resident" means a person who has:

1. Established a residence in the State of Nevada; and

2. Actually resided in this state for at least 6 months or has a valid driver`s license or identification card issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles of this state.


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Does The State Of Nevada Offer Any Types Of Tax Assistance Or Exemptions To Individual Taxpayers?
Yes, Nevada offers tax exemptions to persons meeting certain requirements such as: Surviving Spouse, Veterans, Disabled Veterans, and Blind Persons. These exemptions can be applied to real property, personal property (mobile homes, etc.) or used to exempt all or part of your vehicle privilege tax. The tax dollar amount of the exemption varies.

Nevada also has special exclusions for pollution control, radioactive fallout shelters, renewable resource heating and cooling systems, and residential construction to remove architectural barriers for handicapped persons.


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How Do I Apply For Tax Exemption For Non-Profit Or Religious Organizations, Low-Income Housing And Charter Schools?
An application must be completed and returned to the Assessor`s office.  Call 775-328-2266 for information and to request the appropriate application.

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Who Is Eligible For A Surviving Spouse And How Do I Make Application?
This exemption applies to surviving spouses who are residents of the State of Nevada.  To receive this exemption a surviving spouse must bring a copy of the death certificate to the Assessor`s office when initially applying for the exemption, and sign an affidavit of bona fide residency*. 

A surviving spouse of a 60% or greater disabled veteran may also qualify to receive an additional exemption, please contact our office for details.

*NRS 361.015 "Bona fide resident" defined. "Bona fide resident" means a person who has:

1. Established a residence in the State of Nevada; and

2. Actually resided in this state for at least 6 months or has a valid driver`s license or identification card issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles of this state.


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What Are The Requirements For A "Veteran's" Exemption
The Veteran`s exemption is applicable to an honorably discharged veteran of the Armed Forces of the United States who is a bona fide resident* of the State of Nevada and:
     
(a) Has served a minimum of 90 continuous days on active duty, who was assigned to active duty at some time between April 21, 1898, and June 15, 1903, or between April 6, 1917, and November 11, 1918, or between December 7, 1941, and December 31, 1946, or between June 25, 1950, and May 7, 1975, or between September 26, 1982, and December 1, 1987, or between October 23, 1983, and November 21, 1983, or between December 20, 1989, and January 31, 1990, or between August 2, 1990, and April 11, 1991, or between December 5, 1992, and March 31, 1994, or between November 20, 1995, and December 20, 1996;

(b) Has served on active duty in connection with carrying out the authorization granted to the President of the United States in Public Law 102-1; or

(c) Has served on active duty in connection with a campaign or expedition for service in which a medal has been authorized by the Government of the United States, regardless of the number of days served on active duty,

and who received, upon severance from service, an honorable discharge or certificate of satisfactory service from the Armed Forces of the United States, or who, having so served, is still serving in the Armed Forces of the United States, is exempt from taxation.

When filing for the first time, it is necessary to bring in a copy of your separation papers showing dates of entry and discharge or release from active duty.

*NRS 361.015 "Bona fide resident" defined. "Bona fide resident" means a person who has:

1. Established a residence in the State of Nevada; and

2. Actually resided in this state for at least 6 months or has a valid driver`s license or identification card issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles of this state.


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When Should I Apply For An Exemption?
For an exemption to be used on real property, the application must be made and the real property exemption card signed on or before June 15, prior to the start of the new tax year. If the exemption is to be applied to personal property or a motor vehicle, the personal property exemption card may be signed any time on or before the date such taxes are due.

An initial claim for a tax exemption on real property acquired after June 15 and before July 1 must be filed on or before July 5.


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Map Related FAQs

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I don't know if my property has an access easement. Can someone at the Assessor's Office help me find out?
No, we do not research or determine whether particular parcels have access.  Easements must be researched by the interested party at the Washoe County Recorder's Office.  A title company can help with this also.

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I need to get an elevation certificate for my property.
If you are required to have a topographic survey for a building permit or certificate of occupancy, you must hire a surveyor to do this for you and fill out an elevation certificate. If you need to get a copy of the elevation certificate that was submitted previously by you or the previous owner of a property, contact Washoe County Engineering.

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Can you tell me if my property is within a FEMA floodplain?
We do not keep FEMA Floodplain maps in the Assessor’s Office. For information on whether your property falls within a floodplain, contact Washoe County Engineering.

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Can someone at the Assessor's Office tell me what my property rights are?
No, we do not provide legal advice on property rights or any other subject.  A title company or an attorney who specializes in issues related to real estate should be contacted.

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My neighbor built his fence on my property and now he won't move it. Can you write him a letter telling him he has to move the fence?
No.  We do not have the ability to settle disputes between property owners as to whether an encroachment has occurred with regard to fences, sheds or any other use or structure.

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I need to get a copy of a plot plan for my property. Does your office have this information?
We do not have building plot plans in the Assessor's Office. The Building Departments of Reno, Sparks and Washoe County may have plot plans on file for recent construction.  The Washoe County Building Department has an instructional pamphlet that tells how to draw your own plot plan.

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My neighbor keeps driving across my property without my permission. Can someone at the Assessor's Office help me prove to him that he has no right to do this?
This is a private matter between you and your neighbor.  The Assessor’s Office does not get involved in private disputes over property issues.

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I need to find out what the setback requirements are on my property.
The Assessor’s office does not keep records on building setback requirements. The Building Departments of Reno, Sparks and Washoe County can give you that information for your particular parcel.

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Can I call someone at the Assessor's Office to come out and survey my property or help me locate my property corners?
No, the Assessor's Office staff does not survey property. If you need a surveyor, there are many qualified people listed under "Surveyors" in the yellow pages of the phone book.

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Public Service

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What Is The Function Of The Assessor`s Office?
The role of the Assessor's Office is to estimate property values. We do not collect taxes. But, by law, we must discover all taxable property in the County and appraise its value, then calculate 35% of that appraised value to determine its assessed value.

If your opinion of the value of your property differs from the Assessor's, please contact our office and discuss the matter. We will be glad to answer your questions about the appraisal and explain how to appeal if we cannot come to an agreement.


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How Are Taxes Collected?
Taxes are collected by the County Treasurer based on tax bills sent out in July, and on some new construction, bills sent out in December of each year. All questions on taxes paid or to be paid should be directed to the Treasurer`s Office at 328-2510.


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How Often Can Your Assessed Value Change?
Annually. Each year, all properties will either be reappraised or their previous assessed value will be factored using factors established or approved by the Nevada Tax Commission


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What If You Disagree With Your Assessed Value?
When the real property tax roll is completed each November, value change notices are sent to all taxpayers. If you have a question, you may call the Assessor`s Office or come in and talk to an appraiser. If we are unable to resolve your concern you may appeal to the  County Board of Equalization . If you are still not satisfied, you may appeal to the State Board of Equalization, and, thereafter, through the Court System. Any of theses bodies may adjust your assessed value. Appeals to the County Board of Equalization must be filed at the Assessor`s Office no later than January 15th.

Personal Property is billed at various times during the year.  If, in your opinion, the assessed value of your personal property shown on your bill is incorrect please feel free to contact the Assessor`s Office. If, after discussing the matter, a difference of opinion still exists, you may appeal your assessment to the County or State Board of Equalization. You may obtain the forms from the Assessor`s Office.


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What should I do if my mailing address has changed?

The Treasurer`s Office maintains the mailing address information used by our office. The owner of a property can request a change of mailing address for your property taxes by:

Mail: Washoe County Treasurer P.O. Box 30039 Reno, NV 89520

Be sure to write legibly and include: your name, property address/parcel number, current mailing address, new mailing address, your signature.


Email: tax@washoecounty.us

Fax: (775) 328-2500

Use our online form



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What Causes Your Taxes To Change?
They change when either your tax rate changes or your assessed value changes. Your assessed value can change because of a boundary change, new construction, a change in use, reappraisal or factoring.
  • Boundary changes occur when old parcels are either subdivided or combined.
  • New construction includes new buildings, additions, remodeling, etc.
  • Changes in use are, for example, a change from residential use to office or retail use.
  • Reappraisal or factoring is done to keep values up to date with changes in individual properties, local and neighborhood trends, and inflation or recession.


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What If Something Happens To Your Property?
If your property has been removed, or severely damaged by a disaster such as a landslide, flood, etc. please contact the Assessor’s Office so that we can correct your assessed value.


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What Is The Taxable Value Of Your Property?
The Taxable Value of your land is the Assessor's estimate of its full cash value, taking into account its location, zoning, actual use, etc. The Taxable Value of your buildings is their estimated replacement cost less depreciation. Your taxes will be based on your total assessed value, which is 35% of your total appraised value. For value information on your property assessment data please click here to access the parcel summary page.


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Who Sets The Tax Rate?
Your tax rate is established in the spring of each year by the Nevada Tax Commission from budgets submitted by local governmental entities such as City of Reno, City of Sparks, Washoe County, Fire Protection Districts, School District and others. Services provided by those governmental bodies are a result of these budgets, and questions about governmental services should be directed to those agencies.


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Real Property

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How Can I Get Specific Data On Both My Home And Real Commercial Parcels?
Click here for For Real Property Assessment Data.  Data updated nightly and will give you specific information for the parcels.

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Is This a Tax Bill?
No, tax bills are mailed by the Washoe County Treasurer. Tax bills for the secured  tax roll are mailed in July of each year.  Tax bills for unsecured real property are mailed in November


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What If I Do Not Agree With The Appraisal?
If we are unable to resolve your concerns you can appeal to the County Board of Equalization for a review of  your property's  taxable value.  The appeal forms may be obtained by contacting our office or the Nevada Department of Taxation. Your appeal must be filed by January 15th.

Please note:  the burden of proof is on the taxpayer to show that the valuation is in error or that the taxable value exceeds full cash value (market value).

Also note:   the role of the Assessor is property valuations, not property taxes, or property tax rates.  Questions concerning your taxes should be directed to your County Commissioner or locally elected state representative.

The appeal form and additional information can be found on our website on our Assessment Notice/Appeal Information page.


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What Should I Do With The Notice?
This is your first opportunity to review the proposed taxable value of your property.  If you believe that this new value is in error or is above the full cash value for your property, please call  (775) 328-2233 or visit the Assessor`s office at 1001 E Ninth St. and ask to speak to an appraiser.  Upon request, our office will furnish a copy of the most recent appraisal of the property and more often than not your question or concern can be resolved on the initial phone call or visit. Information on your property assessment can also be found through our Property Assessment Data web pages.

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Why Did I Receive A Value Notice?
Pursuant to the Nevada Revised Statutes, the Office of the Washoe County Assessor mails assessment notices to the property owners of Washoe County to inform them of the proposed taxable and assessed value of the real property on the tax roll for the next fiscal year. 

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Why Did My Values Change?
The Taxable Value can change because of a boundary change, new construction, a change in use, a reappraisal, or any combination of these factors.
  • Boundary changes occur when old parcels are either divided or combined.
  • New construction includes new buildings, additions, remodeling, etc.
  • Changes in use can include such changes as converting a residence to office or retail use or land from agricultural use to residential use.
  • Reappraisal of property is done annually. Improvements are recalculated to current cost of replacement less depreciation and land is revalued to reflect the current market.


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Why Didn't I Receive A Value Notice

The Assessor`s Office makes every effort to send each property owner a value notice; however  postal delays cannot be controlled.  If you would like to verify that this office has the correct mailing address please contact our office at (775) 328-2233. 
You can also verify your mailing address on line by going to Real Property Assessment Data then click on "Go To Search Page".  There you will be able to look up
your parcel using your Parcel Number, Street Address, or Owner Name.

The full secured tax roll will be printed in the newspaper, per NRS 361  , before the first day in January.  Copies will be available at the Washoe County Assessors Office and at Washoe County Libraries.

Failure to receive a value notice does not invalidate an appraisal or reappraisal.



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Do All Owners Of A Given Property Have To Sign The Letter?
No.  Any owner or legally authorized agent may sign the letter.

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Is My Taxable Value Capped?
No, only the amount of increase on your tax bill is capped.

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Tax Cap

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I Received The 3% Tax Cap, Why Did My Assessed Value Go Up By More Than 3%?
The 3% tax cap is applied to your tax amount, not the assessed value of your property.


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Can I Apply For Or Change My Cap Over The Phone?
No, you must sign the application and, if necessary, the rental questionnaire as the property owner. We will send the documents to you upon request.

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What If I Run A Business In My Primary Residence? Does My Property Still Qualify For The 3% Tax Cap
If your parcel has a land use code (zoning) of residential, your property would still qualify for the 3% tax cap.


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I disagree with the decision on my appeal. What is my next step?
If you disagree with the decision on your appeal you may contact the Assessor`s Office with additional information and/or appeal the decision to the Nevada Tax Commission as outlined in Nevada Revised Statute 361.4734(2)

You have 30 days after receiving notice of the Assessor`s decision to file an appeal with the Nevada Tax Commission.


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Do I Have To Give You This Information?
No, but you will not qualify for the primary residence or residential rental (low income rental) tax cap if you do not, and you must sign the form.

Please note: Incomplete and/or unsigned forms may result in the property not qualifying for the lower tax cap which may result in a higher tax bill.


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If my home is under construction and I am living on the land in a mobile home, can the property qualify as my primary residence (3% "Tax Cap")
Yes, as long as you are not already claiming another property in the State of Nevada as your primary residence.

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How Do I Qualify For A 3% Tax Cap For Rental Property?
Each and every rental unit on the parcel must be rented for equal to or less than the HUD median market rent. All units must qualify.

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What If I Sell My Home Or Purchase A New Home?
The transfer of ownership of property will trigger a new affidavit to be mailed to the new owner to verify the status. The new affidavits will be mailed in April and August.

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Is My Tax Rate Capped?

The Partial Abatement (“Tax Cap”) legislation does not cap the tax rate, however, other legislation does.

The primary statue is Nevada Revised Statute 361.453.  Legislation may allow for some specific rates to be excluded from the limitation.

For more information on Tax Rates please visit the website for the Washoe County Treasurer.



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Is The Land My Manufactured Home Sits On Eligible For The 3% Cap On Taxes?
If you own both the land and the manufactured home, and occupy the manufactured home as your primary residence you are eligible for the 3% tax cap on the land and manufactured home.  This applies even if the manufactured home has not been converted to real property. 

If you own the manufactured home but not the land, the manufactured home is eligible for the 3% tax cap. The cap level for the land would be determined based on the space rent charged.

If you own the land but not the manufactured home you would not be eligible for the 3% tax cap unless the space rent is less than the HUD median market rent.

If you own the land and the manufactured home but they are a rental, you are eligible for the 3% tax cap only if the rent you are charging is equal to or less than the HUD median market rent.


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I Own Many Homes Throughout Nevada, Each Of Which Is Used Only By Me. Can They All Qualify For The 3% Cap?
You can have only one primary residence in Nevada, however, if each home that you own has a family member living in it full time, that does not pay any rent, then that home would qualify for the 3% cap as a rental, renting below HUD median market rent.  (The rent would be $0.00 a month.)

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I Own A Motel That Rents Weekly For Less Than HUD Median Market Rent For The Month. Do I Qualify For The 3% Cap?
No, transient lodging does not qualify.

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I Have Multiple Properties Owned By A Trust That A Trust Beneficiary Live In. Will The 3% Tax Cap Apply To These Properties?
Yes, all properties which a beneficiary of the trust occupies as a primary residence would qualify for the 3% tax cap.


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I Rent My Property Occasionally for about 400 Per Day for a week or so. Does it qualify as Primary Residence since I only made 3300 last year?

No, if you rent by the day, your property would be considered transient lodging, which does not qualify. A better way to do the math would be:  Rent of $400 a day X 30 days in a month = $12,000 a month rent, which is above HUD median market rent, and would not qualify.



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I Own Many Homes, But Only One Home In Nevada. Do I Qualify For The 3% Cap?
The home in Nevada could qualify as your primary residence provided it meets all the previously stated requirements and it is not rented out at any time when you are not occupying the home.

If it is a full time rental and meets the HUD low rental guidelines it may qualify for the 3% residential rental tax cap.


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What If My Primary Residence Is On The Same Parcel As My Business?
If your parcel has a land use code (zoning) of commercial and it also includes your primary residence, the residential portion of your property can qualify for the 3% cap. 

The county assessor may determine the separate portions of your property that are commercial (non-qualifying) and residential (qualifying) and apply to each such portion the appropriate partial abatement from property taxes.


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I received tax cap forms for my rental properties, but I didn't receive one for my primary residence. Should I have received one?
Once we receive a claim form  for an owner occupied primary residence we maintain the 3% cap on the property unless there is an ownership change, mailing address change, or if the owner notifies us of a status change.  At that time we would send out another claim form for verification.  We have to verify rents every year so you'll continue to receive the rental forms.

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What If I Rent Out A Room In My Primary Residence?
If you live in the home you own, it is considered your primary residence and therefore qualifies for the 3% tax cap.


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What If I Rent Out My Guesthouse Or Casita?
The rent you are charging would need to be equal to or less than the HUD median market rent in order to qualify for the 3% cap. The higher cap would apply unless it is a new property for this year, which does not have a cap.

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You Denied My Request For The 3% (Or Higher) Tax Cap, How Do I Appeal Your Decision?

The Assessor`s Office has created a form for you to fill out to appeal the decision made on the tax cap applied to your property. You can obtain that form by calling, writing or coming in to the Assessor`s Office and asking for the Partial Abatement, "tax cap",  appeal form.  It is also available on their web site: 

Jump to Appeal Form Link
 
The deadline to appeal is June 30th.

The Assessor has 30 days to respond to your appeal.



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Why did my tax bill increase when my assessed value decreased or did not change?
Because the current year tax bill is calculated based on the prior year tax bill,  changes in assessed value do not have as much impact on a tax bill (up or down) as they did prior to the law change.

The abatement is the amount of additional taxes that would have been owed if not for the tax cap. For a property with a 3% tax cap, if the 2008 tax bill was $1,000 the 2009 tax bill could be no more than $1,030 even if the calculated taxes (assessed value x tax rate) were $1,050.

In the example above the $20 difference between the actual tax bill of $1,030 and the calculated tax bill of $1,050 is the abatement.

The abatement amount is identified on the tax bill. A decrease in assessed value will not result in a decrease in taxes until the prior year`s tax bill plus your tax cap percentage is greater than your actual calculated taxes. In an increasing market you may receive abatement for each year. In a declining or stagnant market your tax bill may eventually increase until there is no abatement for a tax year.

For most properties, fiscal year 2004/05 is the base year for applying the tax cap and calculating the abatement. Although values may have increased in succeeding years, the new law limits the increase to a tax bill to 3% or 8%.

Any increase in value (except increases due to improvement to or changes in the actual or authorized use of the property) that would cause a property owners tax bill to increase by more than 3% or 8% results in an abatement of the taxes.

For parcels created after fiscal year 2004/05, which are designated as "new parcels", the base year would be the year the parcel was created and the abatement and tax cap would apply from that year forward.


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Why Did My Bill Go Up By More Than The Prescribed Cap From Last Year's Bill?

The following situations could cause an increase of more than the prescribed cap:

An exemption, which was applied to last years tax bill, was removed for
the current year.

There was a change in use for the property such as a zoning change or mobile home conversion.

There was new construction or improvement to the property.


New voter approved increases were levied or the property was annexed into a district with a higher tax rate.

There are items billed on your tax bill that are not ad valorem taxes.  These are not affected by the tax cap, and could increase more than the prescribed cap.



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How Does The Tax Cap Affect My Exemption?
The exemption will be applied to the tax bill after the cap is applied.


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I Rented My House On July 1st For More Than HUD Median Market Rents, But Now In November Of The Same Year, It Is My Primary Residence. Can I Receive The 3% Cap For The Remainder Of The Fiscal Year?
No, the cap is applied based on the status effective July 1st of that fiscal year ( our fiscal year is July 1 thru June 30).  You can change your property qualification to primary residence effective July 1st of the following year.

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What Does Primary Residence Mean?
A residence which is designated by the owner as the primary residence of the owner in this State, exclusive of any other residence of the owner in this State; AND

Which is not rented, leased or otherwise made available for exclusive occupancy by any person other than the owner of the residence and members of the family of the owner.


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What Is Capped Under The Partial Abatement Statutes?
The statutes provide for a partial abatement of the ad valorem taxes levied on a qualified property. The effect of this partial abatement results in a Tax Cap. The tax cap will limit the increase of your tax bill to 3% over the previous year`s tax amount for your primary residence within Nevada or rental properties where the rent charged does not exceed the fair market rent for the county in which the dwelling is located, as most recently published by HUD.  Most other property will receive a higher "cap". The higher cap is subject to change yearly.  The tax caps do not limit the increase in assessed value.

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What Is The Partial Abatement?
NRS 361.471-361.4735 provides for a partial abatement of taxes by limiting or "capping" the amount a tax bill can increase from year to year. The increase is limited to 3% for an owner occupied primary residence (single-family home, townhouse, condominium or manufactured home) and certain qualified rental properties. Tax bills for all other properties (residences that are not owner occupied, land, commercial buildings, business personal property, aircraft, etc.) are limited to a percentage not to exceed 8%.

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Who Is Eligible For The 3% Tax Cap?
All owner occupied homes (including single-family homes, condos, townhouses and manufactured homes) that are used as primary residences qualify for the 3% tax cap.  Also, rental units may be eligible if all the units are rented for equal to or less than the HUD median market rents.


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Will My Tax Bill Increase By The Amount Of The Corresponding Cap?
Not necessarily, any property where the percentage of tax increase is less than the corresponding cap, and there is no prior abatement,  will only be billed the original increase of the taxes. The corresponding cap will not automatically increase the tax bill.